What Neuroscience Says About Leaders Who Take a Stand on Societal Issues

The NeuroLeadership Institute's Laura Cassiday and David Rock explain what neuroscience tells us about three common approaches to controversial social issues.

As organizations reexamine their workforce amid AI advancements and downsizing, we wonder if it’s also time to reexamine the super chicken theory. In biologist William Muir’s famous experiment, a group of high-performing hens that were housed together pecked each other (sometimes to death) rather than inspiring each other to produce more eggs. A similar idea – that you can’t have more than a few top people on the same team – remains widespread in many organizations. But maybe it’s time to rethink that notion. 

Read more in Fast Company.

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NLI in Harvard Business Review: 3 Ways to Compassionately Hold Your Team Accountable

Why are some teams more successful than others when it comes to meeting deadlines, hitting targets, and growing revenues? Researchers at the NeuroLeadership Institute looked at the cognitive processes associated with leaders who cultivate accountability on their teams. They identified three distinct habits practiced by these leaders: They think ahead, obsess about commitments, and anchor on solutions.

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